Conglomerates

This sutta, is an accumulation of terrible translations, which historically made it incomprehensible. Starting with the name, which many call “aggregates”:

 

Collection of Thematically Grouped Speeches
Connected discourses on conglomerates
SN 22.48 Conglomerates

In Savatthi. “Bhikkhus, I will show you the five conglomerates and the five conglomerates subject to stickiness. Listen to that …

“And what, bhikkhus, are the five conglomerates?

Whatever type of appearance there is, whether past, future or present, internal or external, coarse or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close: this is called the conglomerate of appearances.

Whatever the type of emotional reaction that produces either past, future or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close: this is called the conglomerate of emotional reactions.

Whatever the type of perception, of detection that exists whether past, future or present, internal or external, coarse or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close: this is called the conglomerate of perceptions.

Whatever type of conditionality it produces, be it past, future or present, internal or external, coarse or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close: this is called conglomerate of conditionality.

Whatever kind of consciousness there is, whether past, future or present, internal or external, coarse or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close: this is called a conglomerate of consciousnesses.

These, bhikkhus, are called the five conglomerates.

“And, bhikkhus, are the five conglomerates subject to sticking, to adhering?

Whatever type of appearance there may be, past, future or present, distant or close, that is flawed, it may stick, it may adhere: this is called a heaped appearance subject to adhesion.

Whatever type of emotional reaction there was, past, future or present, distant or close, which is flawed, can stick, can adhere: this is called the emotional reaction piled up able to adhere.

Whatever type of perception there is, past, future or present, distant or close, which is contaminated, can cling to: this is called the subject of accumulated perception susceptible to adhering.

Whatever the type of conditions that occur … that are flawed, can stick, adhere: they are called lots of conditionalities capable of adhering.

Whatever type of consciousness there is, past, future or present, internal or external, coarse or subtle, inferior or superior, distant or close, that can stick, adhere: this is called a conglomerate of consciousness subject to adherence.

These, bhikkhus, are called the five conglomerates subject to adherence. “

The analysis from heaps or conglomerates is not the clearest or most effective way to understand the functioning of the conditioned origin.However, even though they do not understand what each of these elements are, due to the stubborn sectarian taboo of translations as absurd as unquestioned, different religious groups insist on using them with the consequence that by not understanding them and trying to explain them , they immediately jump to the mantra. They recite it compulsively trying not to think about what it might mean.

Significantly the word “saṅkhāra” appears in the dictionary of the Pāli Text Society with this warning:

One of the most difficult terms of Buddhist metaphysics, in which the combination of the subjective-objective vision of the world and the peculiar fact of the East, is so complete, that it is almost impossible for Western terminology to reach the root of its meaning. in a translation. We can only convey an idea of ​​its importance by representing several sides of its application, without trying to give a “word” as a definition.

Etymologically it gives an idea of ​​an enumeration (saṅkhā) of conditions that define the current conditional state. Each new phenomenon produces a change in the conditional system or kamma, on which the life principle is based. Life is the process of change in the kamma, life deals precisely with the cumulative, heap, or conglomerate group of saṅkhāras.

Similarly, as we saw in other chapters, emotional reactions are translated with words that have nothing to do, such as “feeling” or “feeling”.

They like to use the word “form” to define the appearance, how the observed appears. Again, another erroneous translation.

We can say that in the interface-consciousness binomial, where the interface is namā and rūpa, appearance and emotional reactions correspond to rūpa, whereas perception or apprehension corresponds to namā.

The saṅkhāras are in the middle of the connection between the interface and consciousness, mutually co-dependent.

Consciousness, what you observe, is the fifth accumulated.

Nor is it so difficult …

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